Burglary

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Last Updated on Thursday, 30 October 2014 13:55

There are millions of burglaries in the United States each year.  Citizens can take measures to enhance the security of their homes and businesses.  The following are crime prevention strategies that you may wish to consider:

1.   Check your doors.  Assess the door itself, as well as the hinges, locks, and hardware:
     -Dead bolt locks are always recommended on exterior doors.
     -Exterior door hinges should have non-removable pins.
     -Dowels can be placed along the track of sliding glass doors, to prevent prying.
     -Sheet metal screws in the upper track of sliding glass doors can prevent removal.
2.   Check your windows.  Can they be locked or pinned?
3.   Make sure that your garage door is closed and locked.
4.   Try to eliminate shrubs or items along walkways or driveways that could provide concealment.
5.   Consider gates or fences to make entry more difficult.
6.   Trim shrubs to increase visibility by neighbors and law enforcement.
7.   Take measures to keep up the property and yard.
8.   Consider a residential alarm, available from electrical and hardware dealers.
9.   Exterior lighting is important in deterring criminals.  
10. Electronic timers on interior lights gives the appearance that someone is home.
11. Talk with your neighbors.  Assist one another in keeping your neighborhood secure.

 


 

Burglary in the 1st Degree

(1) A person is guilty of burglary in the first degree if, with intent to commit a crime against a person or property therein, he or she enters or remains unlawfully in a building and if, in entering or while in the building or in immediate flight therefrom, the actor or another participant in the crime (a) is armed with a deadly weapon, or (b) assaults any person.

     (2) Burglary in the first degree is a class A felony.

 Residential Burglary

(1) A person is guilty of residential burglary if, with intent to commit a crime against a person or property therein, the person enters or remains unlawfully in a dwelling other than a vehicle.

     (2) Residential burglary is a class B felony. In establishing sentencing guidelines and disposition standards, residential burglary is to be considered a more serious offense than second degree burglary.

Burglary in the 2nd Degree

(1) A person is guilty of burglary in the second degree if, with intent to commit a crime against a person or property therein, he or she enters or remains unlawfully in a building other than a vehicle or a dwelling.

     (2) Burglary in the second degree is a class B felony.

Making or Having Burglar Tools

(1) Every person who shall make or mend or cause to be made or mended, or have in his or her possession, any engine, machine, tool, false key, pick lock, bit, nippers, or implement adapted, designed, or commonly used for the commission of burglary under circumstances evincing an intent to use or employ, or allow the same to be used or employed in the commission of a burglary, or knowing that the same is intended to be so used, shall be guilty of making or having burglar tools.

     (2) Making or having burglar tools is a gross misdemeanor.

Burglary & The Law
Washington State Chapter 9A.52 RCW